Poppycock Album Now Up Exclusively at the Tallest Poppy in Winnipeg

This past summer, Pip Skid and I participated in an artist residency put on by Synonym Art Consultation at The Tallest Poppy in Winnipeg. We spent a whole weekend in one of the booths at the diner making beats, writing lyrics and recording songs while dining customers stared at us in bewilderment. We had a few friends stop by to help us out, and the result is the Poppycock mixtape. The mixtape features guest artists Birdapres, Greg MacPherson, Charlie Fettah, Nestor Wynrush, Watg Steve of 3peat and Mic Holden. Currently the only place in the universe to hear it is at the Tallest Poppy. It is on constant loop, playing out of a jukebox that was crafted by Pip Skid himself (pictured below). If you happen to be in Winnipeg, head down and grab a spot close to the earphones!

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Marathon of Dope Compilation Volume II

There is a new Marathon of Dope compilation complete with all new and exclusive songs by some of the great artists I’m proud to be associated with, such as Pip Skid, Bazooka Joe, Nestor Wynrush, Birdapres, Zucchini Drive, Nomad, Mike Ladd and more. Download the whole thing here for free.

Listen to the brand new song I did exlcusively for the compilation:

 

“Marathon Of Dope is proud to present our second compilation. We have drawn from this community’s diverse pool of talent, and built a collection of new and unreleased tracks as a special thanks for all of your support. Please enjoy this free smorgasbord of M.O.D. exclusives. Whether you’re searching for an old favorite flavor, a glimpse of a secret side-project, a nostalgic melody, an intricately wound instrumental, or just something to dance to, this compilation has something just for you.”

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Witchpolice LIVE!

11865157_822232517896799_8665678578962589590_oGarbage Hill Podcast Network presents Witchpolice Radio Live and Direct! It’s a live podcast!

With guests: MONA MOUSA, NESTOR WYNRUSH, ROB CROOKS, and members of RASTAMILS!

Witchpolice Radio, one of Winnipeg’s best-loved and longest-running music podcasts, is hitting the stage for the first time in 140+ episodes! Sam and Ryan will be interviewing musicians as usual, but our guests will be performing songs live as wel!

FREE ADMISSION!

GUESTS:


***MONA MOUSA***
https://www.facebook.com/mfmpoetry
http://www.monamousa.com/

in 2007 an eighteen year old Toronto girl got on a greyhound to figure out what this poetry thing is all about.

Seven years later as a spoken word artist, motivational speaker, and jill of all trades, Mona Mousa is rooted in the theory that we can all turn our scars into stories. Moving audiences, and calling them to action for important causes, Mona has never been one for small talk in turn she works everyday to start dialogue and challenge societies norms.

Performing all over North America, she aims to use poetry to inspires people who haven’t found their voices yet. Her poetry sheds light on the struggles of mental health, sexual abuse and racial discrimination and she shares her personal experiences through poetry to encourage and empower others to be themselves and remain strong in the face of adversity.

***NESTOR WYNRUSH***
http://marathonofdope.com/portfolio/nestor-wynrush/

Elliott Walsh is Nestor Wynrush. Born in Winnipeg, raised in Mississauga, this first-generation Canadian taps his West Indian roots to cook up an authentic pot-au-feu that can aptly be described as rap-soul, black & roll.

With a hustle unsurpassed on the Canadian Prairies, Wynrush is closing in on ten years of recording and performing his charismatic style of rap music.

Wynrush’s music is personal, sincere and unvarnished. It’s storytelling music informed by love, sorrow, and the overall immigrant experience in Canada. Never does he eschew his roots in favour of appealing to a wider market. Truth be told, without his roots, Nestor Wynrush’s music wouldn’t exist.

***ROB CROOKS***
http://www.robcrooks.com/
https://www.facebook.com/RobCrooksMusic

My name is Rob Crooks. I’m from Winnipeg. I make unconventional forms of hip-hop music. This is my bio.

I write songs. By the time I was 24 years old, I was selling CDs and traveling all across Canada performing them, from Victoria to Montreal. Eventually people started to notice the songs I wrote. Within a few years I had written songs for people like Canadian hip-hop veterans Ismaila Alfa (fka Mocean of Frek Sho) and Pip Skid. I’ve also written the bulk of Magnum KI’s material, including half of their 2010 self-titled album, which was nominated for a Western Canadian Music Award.

Nowadays, I’d just as soon take my sampler up on stage with me and pound out beats from the pads, and rap my own songs – or sing them – by myself.

***RASTAMILS***
https://www.facebook.com/RasTamils
http://rastamils1.bandcamp.com/

RasTamils offer a beautifully layered and tasteful take on classic reggae rhythms while also weaving in some jam-band influence, the hooky pop components of simple ‘60s rock, and a vocal style that pays homage to heralded East Indian pop singers in a wonderfully harmonious package.

http://www.witchpolice.com/
http://www.garbagehillnetwork.com/

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Saskatoon and Cinematheque

11072540_10155342338740029_6883297363913230517_nThis Friday, May 22nd Nestor Wynrush and I will be the guests of Soso and Dj Chaps in Saskatoon. We play at Amigos. I can’t wait. Travis Cole will also be Djing that night. It will be fun.

I can’t wait to leave this city and go to Saskatoon. Bridge city. Paris of the Prairies. Rapskatoon. When Soso joined Nestor Wynrush and I here in Winnipeg last month, I think for the first time it became obvious how well all of our music fits together, in some strange way. This will be another good show, and I am excited for it.

The next day I will be racing back to Winnipeg to perform at the West End Cultural Centre for the annual event Bands Vs. Filmmakers, a fundraiser for my favourite Winnipeg movie theatre, Cinematheque. The concept is a cool one: team a local musical act with a local fimlmaker, and let them collaborate for one night only. I have been paired with Ryan Simmons. Other duos include Pip Skid with Gwen Trutnau, Blunderspublik with Freya Olafson, Attica Riots with Deco Dawson, and  Basic Nature with Forrest Macgregor.Bands-vs-Filmmakers-5-banner-790x511

It’s great to be able to help raise money for such a great place. I’ve seen some amazing films at Cinematheque over the years, and I plan on seeing many more. Tickets are $20 each and are available at the West End Cultural Centre.

 

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Language, Hip-Hop and the 23rd of April at the Cavern in Winnipeg

soso_April23The meaning of a word depends on how it is used. This is to say that language is essentially contextual, and that a word only has an identity through its relation to its other. A cliché example of this is when one word, in different contexts, holds opposite meanings, as in when “bad” is used to mean “good.” However, it’s not simply that the word means its opposite, as if it’s a case of simple reversal. Rather, the meaning of the word depends entirely on its use, in the context of the system as a whole. “Bad” does not simply mean “good,” but rather signifies a subversive act against the convoluted history of an oppressive language system.

As specialized languages develop, such as the technical languages of the sciences, or the idiosyncratic vernaculars of sport, for example, words take on a multi-layered etymological history. This rich etymological history of a specialized language can often make it difficult for an outsider to penetrate the particular culture that the language belongs to. On the other hand, when said culture, despite its technical language, becomes popularized, through enticing ideas or images, it is often the specialized language that is the first to be appropriated and watered-down. This is because an outsider, who may not understand the etymological history of a certain term, will take it at face value. It is this superficial appropriation of terminology that helps spread the popularity of the culture. Eventually, the outsiders outnumber the specialists, and the culture itself is reduced to its superficialities.

To the people who consume hip-hop on the largest scale, and who have therefore appropriated it’s signifiers, Iggy Azalea is a more definitive representation of what hip-hop is than someone like, say, Marley Marl, to name one example. This type of watering-down of a culture is inevitable. Once a culture comes to be dominated by outsiders, in other words, once the consumers of a culture outnumber its participants, its meaning shifts from the technical usage to the superficial usage. This is an inevitable result of a culture’s “success.” Hip-hop is one of the most “successful” cultural movements in recent history. As a result, hip-hop has become fashion, a costume you wear on the weekends; hip-hop is something you buy at the mall.

But this is all too cynical. In some corners of the world, hip-hop is still controlled by its participants. In these cases, hip-hop continues to develop in a way that confounds the outsider. Thursday, April 23rd at the Cavern in Winnipeg, there will be a showcase of artists who continue to interpret hip-hop in just such a way. I am proud to be performing with soso, Nestor Wynrush and Lonnie Ce. The occasion for this show is soso’s new album Not for Nothing. soso, who will be traveling from his home in Saskatoon for this show, is one of the bravest and most authentic hip-hop artists I have ever encountered. He is a musical hero of mine and I hope you will all come down to watch his performance.

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