“And the Nothing From Which Nothing Comes” Now Available Everywhere The Internet Is

My new album “And the Nothing From Which Nothing Comes”* is now available to stream on all streaming services. I mean, I don’t know about all streaming services. I can only name two: Apple Music and Spotify. It’s available on those two services for sure. But I think Jay-Z has a streaming service too, right? I don’t know if you can listen to my album on there or not. But check it out if that’s all you’ve got. First listen to the Jay-Z song “22 Twos” and then listen to my album. And listen to it a bunch. Leave it on repeat while you sleep. I think I get .009 cents every time you stream it. So hook me up with some love. Some fraction-of-a-cent love.

If streaming isn’t your thing, you can also purchase the album in either it’s digital or it’s physical form on Disintegration Record’s bandcamp. The physical copies are in the form of cassette tapes. When I tell people about the cassettes they often give me a puzzled look and ask why I would make copies of my album in an obsolete form. It’s not an altogether inappropriate question. But at the speed of which technology is moving, we’re soon going to turn the corner and the only non-obsolete form of music will be streaming, like through the services mentioned above. And as we all should know, streaming services are terrible for artists. So I wanted to produce a physical copy of my album which people can buy as a way to show support for what I’m doing. I thought seriously about CDs, but I personally hate them. Plus, CDs are more obsolete to me than cassettes are: I have no way of playing a CD at home or in m car. I have no CD player nor disc drive in my computer. I do, however, have a cassette deck. But even if you don’t have a cassette deck, cassettes look way cooler than CDs! CDs are a waste of space, but you can put a cassette on your mantel and show it off to guests. It’s fucking retro as shit. And in case you needed more convincing, we’ve included download codes with the cassettes which include 2 additional songs which are not available anywhere else. Because we are marketing geniuses.

Anyways, I hope you can listen to the album and enjoy it, through whatever means available to you. If the only thing you listen to is CDs, there may be some CDs coming down the pike at some point. If you’re waiting for the album to come out on vinyl, all I’ll say is this: “You and me both, friend. You and me both.”

*Please note that for the European release of “And the Nothing From Which Nothing Comes” through Marathon of Dope, the album is called “The Nothing From Which Nothing Comes” due to legal issues regarding U2’s album of the same name.

“And The Nothing From Which Nothing Comes” Release Show May 26th

Rob Crooks is a musician, songwriter and performance artist based in Winnipeg, Canada. With a masters degree in Philosophy and an ear for heavy rhythm and relaxed melodies, Crooks’ newest album, And The Nothing From Which Nothing Comes, is a collection of uncommon, highly listenable songs. Known primarily as a hip hop producer and collaborator (Pip Skid, Ismaila Alfa, John Smith, etc) Crooks has a reputation for taking risks with sound and pushing technological limits in performance. His music is not easily categorized but it is absolutely easy to listen to.

The Nothing From Which Nothing Comes, available on cassette and in digital format, is a shared release between Canada’s Disintegration Records and Belgium’s Marathon of Dope.

“Crooks has a one-of-a-kind ability to combine hip-hop and electronic styles in a way that elevates both the aesthetic energy and uniqueness of his music, as well as the socially informed narrative within his storytelling. He is easily one of the most original and interesting artists in Manitoba”
Ted Turner: CKUW, Stylus, DJ Nocontact

Cherry Cherry is a new electronics/voice duo based in Winnipeg.(Hailey Primrose and Greg MacPherson)

“We Are Not Famous” Video

Video for “We Are Not Famous” from my upcoming album The Nothing From Which Nothing Comes out soon on Disintegration Records and Marathon of Dope. The video is directed by the incomparable Mike Marynuik.  It was filmed on location at the abandoned Target store in Winnipeg.

Yet Once a Just Dance Party

I am happy to announce that on Saturday, April 14th, I will be joining my good friend and sometimes collaborator Speed Dial 7 on stage at the Pand.A club in Kortrijk, Belgium. I am very excited to travel back to Europe, and I look forward to seeing some of the friends that I was lucky to have made the last time I visited. Although my stay will be short and jam-packed, I hope to experience all that I possibly can while I am there.

Unfortunately, my time in Europe will only include one performance. However, for those of you who are fans of film, I will also be participating in another event that may interest you. Back a couple years ago, I played the lead role in a film called The Goose. On Saturday, April 7th, that film will be playing at Lichter Filmfest in Frankfurt. Not only will I be in attendance during that screening, but I will also be introducing the film to those in attendance. If you are a fan of psychedelic coming of age stories, or you think you might be, please come and say hi.

 

Poppycock Album Now Up Exclusively at the Tallest Poppy in Winnipeg

This past summer, Pip Skid and I participated in an artist residency put on by Synonym Art Consultation at The Tallest Poppy in Winnipeg. We spent a whole weekend in one of the booths at the diner making beats, writing lyrics and recording songs while dining customers stared at us in bewilderment. We had a few friends stop by to help us out, and the result is the Poppycock mixtape. The mixtape features guest artists Birdapres, Greg MacPherson, Charlie Fettah, Nestor Wynrush, Watg Steve of 3peat and Mic Holden. Currently the only place in the universe to hear it is at the Tallest Poppy. It is on constant loop, playing out of a jukebox that was crafted by Pip Skid himself (pictured below). If you happen to be in Winnipeg, head down and grab a spot close to the earphones!

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Disintegration Records and The Windsor Hotel Presents:

Rob Crooks – Releasing new single
Figure Walking (Rob Gardiner + Greg MacPherson) – releasing new single
Johnny Phantom (members of Haunter)
DJ No Contact

All proceeds going to Bar None Prison Ride Share

Friday December 23
The Windsor Hotel
Tickets $10.00 advance/$12.00 at the door

Marathon of Dope Compilation Volume II

There is a new Marathon of Dope compilation complete with all new and exclusive songs by some of the great artists I’m proud to be associated with, such as Pip Skid, Bazooka Joe, Nestor Wynrush, Birdapres, Zucchini Drive, Nomad, Mike Ladd and more. Download the whole thing here for free.

Listen to the brand new song I did exlcusively for the compilation:

 

“Marathon Of Dope is proud to present our second compilation. We have drawn from this community’s diverse pool of talent, and built a collection of new and unreleased tracks as a special thanks for all of your support. Please enjoy this free smorgasbord of M.O.D. exclusives. Whether you’re searching for an old favorite flavor, a glimpse of a secret side-project, a nostalgic melody, an intricately wound instrumental, or just something to dance to, this compilation has something just for you.”

Language, Hip-Hop and the 23rd of April at the Cavern in Winnipeg

soso_April23The meaning of a word depends on how it is used. This is to say that language is essentially contextual, and that a word only has an identity through its relation to its other. A cliché example of this is when one word, in different contexts, holds opposite meanings, as in when “bad” is used to mean “good.” However, it’s not simply that the word means its opposite, as if it’s a case of simple reversal. Rather, the meaning of the word depends entirely on its use, in the context of the system as a whole. “Bad” does not simply mean “good,” but rather signifies a subversive act against the convoluted history of an oppressive language system.

As specialized languages develop, such as the technical languages of the sciences, or the idiosyncratic vernaculars of sport, for example, words take on a multi-layered etymological history. This rich etymological history of a specialized language can often make it difficult for an outsider to penetrate the particular culture that the language belongs to. On the other hand, when said culture, despite its technical language, becomes popularized, through enticing ideas or images, it is often the specialized language that is the first to be appropriated and watered-down. This is because an outsider, who may not understand the etymological history of a certain term, will take it at face value. It is this superficial appropriation of terminology that helps spread the popularity of the culture. Eventually, the outsiders outnumber the specialists, and the culture itself is reduced to its superficialities.

To the people who consume hip-hop on the largest scale, and who have therefore appropriated it’s signifiers, Iggy Azalea is a more definitive representation of what hip-hop is than someone like, say, Marley Marl, to name one example. This type of watering-down of a culture is inevitable. Once a culture comes to be dominated by outsiders, in other words, once the consumers of a culture outnumber its participants, its meaning shifts from the technical usage to the superficial usage. This is an inevitable result of a culture’s “success.” Hip-hop is one of the most “successful” cultural movements in recent history. As a result, hip-hop has become fashion, a costume you wear on the weekends; hip-hop is something you buy at the mall.

But this is all too cynical. In some corners of the world, hip-hop is still controlled by its participants. In these cases, hip-hop continues to develop in a way that confounds the outsider. Thursday, April 23rd at the Cavern in Winnipeg, there will be a showcase of artists who continue to interpret hip-hop in just such a way. I am proud to be performing with soso, Nestor Wynrush and Lonnie Ce. The occasion for this show is soso’s new album Not for Nothing. soso, who will be traveling from his home in Saskatoon for this show, is one of the bravest and most authentic hip-hop artists I have ever encountered. He is a musical hero of mine and I hope you will all come down to watch his performance.

Gruf the Druid’s Surface Area Album Release Party

10302093_10155295121885251_1778061248218926227_nThere are three concert memories I have in my mind at all times. One is the memory of some fool in the front row of a Public Enemy concert refusing an offer from Flava Flav to swap his Florida Panthers jersey for the latter’s clock necklace. All these years later, I still ponder from time to time where that shitty Panthers jersey ended up. Gathering dust in some elderly parents’ basement somewhere? Value Village? The landfill? Either way, that guy definitely did not know the time.

The second memory that I always keep with me is the memory of the entire crowd at First Avenue rapping the words to “Shimmy Shimmy Ya,” during the Minneapolis stop of the first Wu-Tang tour after the passing of Ol Dirty Bastard. I’ve seen this happen a few times since, at various Wu-Tang affiliated shows. But the fact that, on this particular occasion, every remaining member of the Clan was there (including Cappadonna, Killah Priest and Buddha Monk), along with the proximity in time to the demise of ODB, made this one a little more memorable.

And finally, there was this one time at the Collective in Osborne Village, when I saw Gruf the Druid commanding a room full of people.

Riding the wave of the Druidry album, the Frek Sho Papercuts EP, and a growing reputation in Winnipeg’s slam poetry scene, Gruf the Druid joined with Dj Brace to release the Sound Barriers album in 2005. Although the album had more than a few mind-bending bangers on it, such as “You Ain’t Folk” and “The 464th Lesson,” to me, the most memorable Sound Barriers song has always been “Withdrawal.” As honest a meditation on money and the effect it has on a person’s psyche as you’ll ever hear, the song ends with a simple statement of a universal truth, that through the act of repetition, becomes transformed into the fevered appeal of anyone at the end of their tether: “I want money, I want money, so much money. I want money, I want money, so much money…”

It was the last song of their set. Gruf had the whole crowd, a packed audience at the once go-to venue, chanting along with him: “I want money…” After all, who could deny it? Sure, it may be a little gauche for the bourgeoisie to admit that they want money. But for anyone in that crowd who didn’t know how they were gonna pay their rent that month; or for anyone who had chosen beer over dinner that night; or for anyone who had walked to the village with holes in their shoes just to see that show, it was a low down, dirty truth. And as Dj Brace lowered the volume of the beat on the turntables, and Gruf gently laid the mic down on the stage floor, and facing forward, backed away towards the stage exit, the crowd continued to chant: “I want money, I want money, so much money.” It was a powerful moment, in a movement of many, for a hip-hop scene that once shared a self-same identity with the city’s downtrodden.

On April 4th, at the Good Will in Winnipeg, Gruf the Druid is celebrating the release of a brand new album, Surface Area, produced entirely by the Gumshoe Strut. The party will feature performances from Bazooka Joe (aka John Smith), myself and, of course, Gruf the Druid. Bazooka Joe will be performing some songs off the new record that I am producing for him, so get their early to check that out. Anchoring the night will be the one and only Dj Hunnicutt. Check out the Facebook event page for more details. And download Surface Area for free from Marathon of Dope.

Downtown ’09 Now Available for Free Download

Downtown 09My new EP Downtown ’09 is now officially available for free download from Marathon of Dope! Please download, listen and pass it around! If you’d like a preview, listen to the song “Stab Somebody.” And please don’t forget, for those of you in Winnipeg, I will be performing every song, plus some others, next Thursday at the Good Will.

Here’s a little more about the EP:

“Winnipeg is a cold and isolated city, dirty and dilapidated. It is a city divided between the South and the North, by race and by class. It is surrounded, like most cities in the Western World, by cookie-cutter suburban homes, box stores and fast food chains. But in the gut of the city, in downtown Winnipeg, the very real divisions that make up its essence intersect in an anarchic clash of hedonism and despair.

It is this image of Winnipeg that serves as the backdrop for Rob Crooks’ new EP Downtown ’09. The iconic punk clubs and temporary speak-easies, the dive bars and late-night beer vendors, the dark alleys where drugs are bought, sold and consumed all make up the setting for Crooks’ story telling. The loosely connected coming-of-age narrative stitched together in these six songs guides the listener through the progressive stages of young adulthood, all in the span of a single weekend. From the earliest encounter with “City Sounds,” and the immature and not-so-innocent trysts with “Friday Night Girls,” to the moral hangover of “Monday Morning,” Downtown ‘09 is an often dark depiction of dysfunctional scenesters in a dysfunctional city.

Sonically, Downtown ’09 matches Crooks’ raw and rapid vocal delivery with the gritty punk aesthetic predominant in Winnipeg’s counter-cultures. The upbeat tempos and catchy hooks give the EP the feel of an illegal dance party, in an abandoned warehouse, ready to be shut down by the police at any moment. Guest appearances by Winnipeg hip-hop legends Pip Skid and John Smith help to round out this short, but detailed vision of the dark side of Winnipeg’s edgy and unpredictable nightlife. So why not spend the weekend in downtown Winnipeg, with Rob Crooks as your guide?”